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Australia and New Zealand have inked an agreement that will allow organisations to electronically verify proof of ID documents issued by either federal government as well as Australian states and territories.

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Australia and New Zealand have inked an agreement that will allow organisations to electronically verify proof of ID documents issued by either federal government as well as Australian states and territories.

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Endorsements

In addition to the six classes, driving some types of vehicles or services require licence endorsements. These can be gained once the appropriate course for the endorsement has been completed. Drivers applying for endorsements I, O, P and V also have to undergo a Police background check.

  • D – dangerous goods
  • F – forklifts
  • I – driving instructor
  • O – driver testing officer
  • P – commercial passenger (e.g. taxi and bus drivers)
  • R – vehicles running on rollers
  • T – vehicles running on self-laying tracks
  • V – vehicle recovery (e.g. tow-truck drivers)
  • W – special-type vehicles running on wheels

Stages for car and motorcycle licences

In 1999 plastic card licences replaced the plasticised paper licences. These needed to be renewed every 10 years, and featured a digital photo of the holder and a signature. Newly styled licences similar to those in Europe were introduced as of 24 November 2014, coming into effect on 1 December 2014. Learner and Restricted licences are now issued for five years (previously ten) whereas full licences continue to be issued for ten years.[4] This rule of licence renewal, however, changes after the person has reached their 75th birthday.

Learner Licence

A car learner licence is gained after scoring at least 32 out of 35 on a multiple-choice test relating to the Road Code.[5] Once gained, it allows the holder to drive a car provided they display black-on-yellow learner plates and are accompanied by a “supervisor” (being any person who has held a full licence for at least two years). After having passed the test, the person will gain a temporary learner licence to use until he/she gains the photo learner licence.[7]

A motorcycle learner licence is gained after passing a basic handling test and scoring at least 32 out of 35 on the theory test. Once gained, it allows the holder to ride a motorcycle provided they display a learner plate on the rear of their motorcycle, they do not ride with passengers or between the hours of 10:00 pm and 5:00 am, and they do not tow another vehicle. They must also only ride on a learner-approved motorcycle (LAMS); these motorcycles must have an engine displacement less than 660cc and a power-to-weight ratio of less than 150 kW per tonne (assuming the rider and their gear weighs 90 kg)

A heavy vehicle learner licence is gained after scoring at least 33 out of 35 on a multiple-choice test about the Road Code.[ There is a heavy vehicle test for classes 2, 3 and 5; the class 4 learner licence test is the same as the class 2 test and is only taken if the person does not hold a class 2 licence.

The learner licence is a blue plastic card and is issued to an applicant who passes the learner’s test. The card is always the colour of the most restrictive licence, so a driver with a full Class 1 car licence and a learner Class 2 heavy vehicle licence will have a blue card.

Restricted Licence

When a driver has held their learner licence for six months, they are eligible to progress to a restricted licence, providing they meet the eyesight and medical requirements, and pass the restricted licence test.

Restricted car licence holders are permitted to drive on their own between the hours of 5 am and 10 pm, and allowed to carry specific passengers such as their long-term partner or spouse, parent, sibling or child. If the licence holder is driving with a supervisor (a person who has held their full licence for a minimum of two years) seated in the front passenger seat, the night driving and passenger restrictions do not apply. Drivers who sat their restricted licence test in an automatic transmission car are only permitted to drive automatic transmission vehicles unless they have a supervisor with them.

Restricted motorcycle licence holders have the same restrictions as on their learner licence, except they no longer have to display learner plates.

The restricted licence is a yellow plastic card.

Full Licence

The final part of the licensing system, a full licence allows the holder to drive at any time and is normally issued without any other conditions. Restricted licence holders may apply for their full licence after holding their restricted licence for a period of 18 months, or 12 months if an approved defensive driving course has been completed (after six months of holding their licence). However, for drivers 25 years of age or older, the period that the restricted licence is held is six months or three months with an approved course having been completed. The practical, in-car test has a duration of 30 minutes. When the holder has held their full licence for two years, they are eligible to act as a supervisor for learner and restricted licence holders.

The full licence is a green plastic card. If a fully licensed driver is subject to court-ordered rules (e.g. a zero alcohol licence), the licence card is pink.

Full licences have to be renewed once every ten years until the driver is 75. Drivers must then renew their driver’s licence on their 75th birthday, 80th birthday, and every second birthday after that.